Author Archives: Charlie & Tim Landon

Captiva Fishing, Redfish, March 1!

Sanibel Fishing Charters, March 1, 2021: Redfish, Catch & Release!

Red Tide/Algae & Daily Salt Water Quality Update Here.
Blue-Green Algae & Daily Fresh Water Quality Update Here.
Captiva Fishing: Please Click For Rates & To Book A Captiva Fishing Charter Or Call 239-472-8658.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, March 1, 2021.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, March 1, 2021.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, February 6, 2021.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, February 6, 2021.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, February 4, 2021.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, February 4, 2021.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, January 16, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, January 16, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, December 29, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, December 29, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, December 22, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, December 22, 2020.
Little Girl, Redfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Saturday, march 24, 2018, [File Photo: Sunday, October 15, 2017}.
Little Girl, Redfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Saturday, March 24, 2018, [File Photo: Sunday, October 15, 2017}.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, November 30, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, November 30, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, November 14, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, November 14, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, November 5, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, November 5, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, November 2, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, November 2, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, October 19, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, October 19, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, October 7, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, October 7, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, October 5, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, October 5, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, May 3, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, May 3, 2020.
Redfish, Captiva Fishing Report: Sunday, April 26, 2020.
Redfish, Captiva Fishing Report: Sunday, April 26, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, January 27, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, January 27, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, December 26, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, December 26, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Friday, December 13, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Friday, December 13, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, December 5, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, December 5, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, November 3, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, November 3, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, October 13, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, October 13, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, September 14, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, September 14, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, June 18, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, June 18, 2019.
Snook and red drum will be catch-and-release only in state waters from the northernmost point of Anna Maria Island in Manatee County to Gordon Pass in Collier County due to impacts from red tide on that area. Source: FWC.
Snook and red drum will be catch-and-release only in state waters from the northernmost point of Anna Maria Island in Manatee County to Gordon Pass in Collier County due to impacts from red tide in that area. Source: FWC.

Sanibel Island Fishing Charters, March 1, 2021

Please Click To Rent Homes Direct From Captiva Homeowners; No VRBO Booking Fees.
Vote Water! Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island.

Vote Water For Florida’s Future!

Captiva Fishing Guide Report: Sunday, March 1, 2021: Redfish, Catch & Release, Captain Joe’s Charters – the weather is great – no significant Red Tide presence, and a lot of good fish in the gulf, bay, and passes; Sharks, Redfish, Spanish Mackerel, Snook, and Seatrout are currently present.

Redfish & snook are regulated as catch & release at this time.

Already seeing some positive impact.  Some very nice big redfish and big snook around. Trout are also coming back.

The Caloosahatchee freshwater releases are also not an issue right now, but still a huge long-term problem.

Extremely frustrating.  We need wholesale changes in the Florida state government.  It is not a Republican or Democrat issue – it is a Big Sugar control everyone issue.  It is stunning how we continue to let the sugar industry and the agriculture north of Lake Okeechobee to damage the water and all of Florida.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658.

We’re located in Castaways Marina, Santiva, Sanibel Island, just before the Blind Pass bridge to Captiva Island.

Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monay, December 24, 2018.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, December 24, 2018.
Redfish, Alex, Catch & Release, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Monday, June 4, 2018.
Redfish, Alex, Catch & Release, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Monday, June 4, 2018.

Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Sanibel Island Fishing Charters: Redfish, September 12, Catch & Release.  Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.

Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, September 16, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, September 16, 2019.

Redfish are now catch & release only.

Little Girl, Redfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Saturday, march 24, 2018, <span data-mce-type=[File Photo: Sunday, October 15, 2017}.” width=”3659″ height=”2882″ />

Little Girl, Redfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Saturday, March 24, 2018, [File Photo: Sunday, October 15, 2017}.

“The red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), also known as channel bassredfishspot tail bass, or simply red, is a game fish found in the Atlantic Ocean from Massachusetts to Florida and in the Gulf of Mexico from Florida to northern Mexico.[1] It is the only species in the genus Sciaenops.

Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Thursday, October 12, 2018.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Friday, October 12, 2018.

The red drum is related to the black drum (Pogonias cromis), and the two species are often found in close proximity to each other; they can interbreed and form a robust hybrid, and younger fish are often indistinguishable in flavor.[2]

Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Friday, October 5, 2018.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Friday, October 5, 2018.

Red drum are a dark red color on the back, which fades into white on the belly. The red drum has a characteristic eyespot near the tail and is somewhat streamlined. Three-year-old red drum typically weigh 6-8 lb. The largest red drum on record weighed just over 94 lb and was caught in 1984 on Hatteras Island. Red drum and black drum both make a croaking or drumming sound when distressed.

Two Happy Fishermen, Two Redfish, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sunday, October 1, 2017 [File Photo: Tuesday, 9-22-15].
Two Happy Fishermen, Two Redfish, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sunday, October 1, 2017 [File Photo: Tuesday, 9-22-15].
The most distinguishing mark on the red drum is one large black spot on the upper part of the tail base. Having multiple spots is not uncommon for this fish, but having no spots is extremely rare. As the fish with multiple spots grow older, they seem to lose their excess spots. Scientists believe that the black spot near their tail helps fool predators into attacking the red drum’s tail instead of its head, allowing the red drum to escape.[3]
Fly Fishing, Redfish, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Tuesday, August 9, 2016.
Fly Fishing, Redfish, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Tuesday, August 9, 2016.

The red drum uses its senses of sight and touch, and its downturned mouth, to locate forage on the bottom through vacuuming or biting. On the top and middle of the water column, it uses changes in the light that might look like food. In the summer and fall, adult red drum feed on crabsshrimp, and mullet; in the spring and winter, adults primarily feed on menhaden, mullet, pinfishsea robinlizardfishspotAtlantic croaker, and mud minnows.

Redfish, Clark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, October 4, 2019.
Redfish, Clark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Friday, October 4, 2019.

Red drum naturally occur along the southern Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts of Louisiana, Texas, Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida. Aquaculture activities involving them occur around the world.[4] Immature red drum prefer grass marsh areas of bays and estuaries when available. Both younger mature red drum (3-6 years of age) and bull red drum prefer rocky outcroppings including jetties and manmade structures, such as oil rigs and bridge posts. Around this type of structure, they are found throughout the water column.”  Please see more information here.

Two Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, February 6, 2019.
Two Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, February 6, 2019.

Red Drum: Sciaenops ocellatus

Florida Regulations: (Harvest in federal waters prohibited)
Regulations Northeast Zone Northwest Zone South Zone
Minimum Size Limit Not less than 18″ no more than 27″ total length
Daily Bag Limit 2 fish per person per day; 8 fish vessel limit 1 per person per day; 8 fish vessel limit 1 fish per person per day; 8 fish vessel limit
Remarks Bag limits apply in areas adjacent to fishing sites such as docks and parking lots

6 fish per person transport limit applies when traveling in a vehicle on land away from a fishing site.

Must remain in whole condition until landed ashore

Commercial harvest prohibited

 

Two Redfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, November 6, 2018.
Two Redfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, November 6, 2018.

Gear requirements:

  • Legal Gear:  hook and line, cast nets
  • Illegal Gear: Spearing (includes spearfishing, gigging and bow fishing) and/or use of multiple hooks in conjunction with live or dead natural bait is prohibited
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, February 24, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, February 24, 2019.

Red Drum Management Zones

  • Northwest: Escambia through Fred Howard Park Causeway near Pasco County
  • South: Fred Howard Park Causeway through Monroe County (west coast) and Miami-Dade through Volusia counties (east coast)
  • Northeast: Flagler through Nassau counties

State Waters Harvest Seasons

Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Monday, October 8, 2018.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Monday, October 8, 2018.

Habitat and Fishing Tips: Red drum, also called redfish, channel bass, spot tail, red bass or reds, are one of Florida’s most popular sportfish and the state’s most widespread estuarine fish.

Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, June 22, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, June 22, 2019.

Red drum are named after the “drumming” sound they make during spawning and when taken out of the water. The sound is produced by muscles rubbing against the inflated air bladder. Red drum inhabit the nearshore and offshore waters throughout the Gulf of Mexico and along the Atlantic coast from Massachusetts to Key West. Juvenile red drum inhabit rivers, bays, canals, tidal creeks, and passes in estuaries for up to four years, after which they usually move to nearshore or open ocean waters as adults.

Redfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Saturday, November 24, 2018.
Redfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Saturday, November 24, 2018.

Red drum in Florida can reach lengths of 45 inches and weigh up to 51 pounds. The world record red drum was caught off North Carolina waters in 1984 and it weighed 94 pounds, 2 ounces.The oldest recorded red drum in Florida was aged at 40 years. Floating a live shrimp under a popping cork is a good way to fish for red drum.

Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, October 27, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, October 27, 2019.

They also chase crabs, mullet, pinfish, and killifish (mud minnows). Casting soft-bodied jigs, spoons and even top-water plugs will catch the attention of these powerful estuarine musicians.

Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, September 11, 2019.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, September 11, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, January 11, 2020.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, January 11, 2020.

State Record:

52 lb 5 oz, caught near Cocoa (1996)

Florida Rule

Please also visit:

Redfish Catch, Hold and Release Tournament Exemption Permit page

Redfish, Dan, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Sunday, September 30, 2018.
Redfish, Dan, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Sunday, September 30, 2018.

Red Drum Management

Management of red drum in Florida is considered a success story.  In the late 1980s, red drum was overfished, thus several emergency closures were established to reduce fishing pressure. In 1989, the slot limit of 18-27 inches, the bag limit of one fish per person and a closed season from March-May were put in place. Red drum stocks have rebounded and are currently meeting or exceeding the FWC’s management goal of 40% escapement in most parts of Florida. Escapement is the proportion of fish that survive through age four relative to the fish that would have survived if there was no fishery.” Please see FWC for more information.

Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, December 7, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, December 7, 2019.

n]

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams. Sunday, September 30, Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Redfish, Passes & Oyster Bars.

Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Wednesday, October 10, 2018.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Wednesday, October 10, 2018.

After a fierce storm, Turner Beach, the beach adjoining the Pass, is frequently covered with a bounty of shells from Olives to Fighting Whelks to the more common Conchs. The fishing is also renowned for sharks in the summer, tailing redfish on the bayside flats and snook under and off the Blind Pass bridge. Because Turner Beach faces Westward, the sunsets are spectacular and a popular viewing point for residents and visitors alike.

Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, October 2, 2018.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, October 2, 2018.

We would appreciate if you like us on Facebook.

Fair winds and following seas,

Captain Joey Burnsed ~ please click calendar or call 239-472-8658 to book a Sanibel & Captiva Islands, Boca Grande or Fort Myers fishing guide trip or shelling charter.

Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, October 7, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, October 7, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, January 22, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, January 22, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Friday, October 11, 2019.
Redfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Friday, October 11, 2019.

 

Captiva Fishing, Ladyfish & Spanish Mackerel, February 28!

Sanibel Fishing Charters, February 28, 2021: Spanish Mackerel, Catch & Release!

Red Tide/Algae & Daily Salt Water Quality Update Here.
Blue-Green Algae & Daily Fresh Water Quality Update Here.
Captiva Fishing: Please Click For Rates & To Book A Captiva Fishing Charter Or Call 239-472-8658.
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, February 28, 2021.
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, February 28, 2021.
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thuesday, August 6, 2020.
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, August 6, 2020.
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, March 24, 2020.
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, March 24, 2020.
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, March 22, 2020.
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, March 22, 2020.
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, February 16, 2020.
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, February 16, 2020.
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, January 5, 2020.
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, January 5, 2020.
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, September 23, 2019.
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, September 23, 2019.

Sanibel Island Fishing Charters, February 28, 2021.

Please Click To Rent Homes Direct From Captiva Homeowners; No VRBO Booking Fees.
Vote Water! Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island.

Vote Water For Florida’s Future!

Captiva Fishing Guide Report: Sunday, February 28: Ladyfish & Spanish Mackerel, Catch & Release, Captain Joe’s Charters – no significant red tide presence and a lot of good fish in the gulf, bay, and passes; redfish, snapper, snook, and seatrout are currently present.

Redfish & snook are regulated as catch & release at this time.

Already seeing some positive impact.  Some very nice big redfish and snook around, more big redfish than snook.

The Caloosahatchee freshwater releases are also not an issue right now, but still a huge long-term problem.

Extremely frustrating.  We need wholesale changes in the Florida state government.  It is not a Republican or Democrat issue – it is a Big Sugar control everyone issue.  It is stunning how we continue to let the sugar industry and the agriculture north of Lake Okeechobee to damage the water and all of Florida.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658.

We’re located in Castaways Marina, Santiva, Sanibel Island, just before the Blind Pass bridge to Captiva Island.

Turner Beach, the beach adjoining Blind Pass, is frequently covered with a bounty of shells from Olives to Fighting Whelks to the more common Conchs.

The fishing is also renowned for sharks in the summer, tailing redfish on the bayside flats and snook under and off the Blind Pass bridge. Because Turner Beach faces Westward, the sunsets are spectacular and a popular viewing point for residents and visitors alike.

Spanish Mackerel, Inshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, June 19, 2018.
Spanish Mackerel, Inshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, June 19, 2018.
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.

Captiva Fishing Charters

Spanish Mackerel, Catch & Release, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, September 13, 2019.

Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.

Spanish Mackerel, Catch & Release, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Sunday, May 13, 2018.
Spanish Mackerel, Catch & Release, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Sunday, May 13, 2018.

“The Atlantic Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus maculatus) is a migratory species of mackerels that swims to the Northern Gulf of Mexico in spring, returns to South Florida in the Eastern Gulf, and to Mexico in the Western Gulf in the fall.

Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, February 21, 2019.
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, February 21, 2019.

The fish exhibits a green back; its sides are silvery marked with about three rows of round to elliptical yellow spots. Lateral line gradually curving down from the upper end of the gill cover toward caudal peduncle. The first (spiny) dorsal fin is black at the front. Posterior membranes are white with a black edge. Its single row of cutting edged teeth in each jaw (around sixty-four teeth in all) are large, uniform, closely spaced and flattened from side to side. As with the King mackerel and the Cero mackerel, these teeth look very similar to those of the BluefishPomatomus saltatrix.

Spanish Mackerel, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Thursday, June 30, 2016.
Spanish Mackerel, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Thursday, June 30, 2016.

Spanish mackerel are a highly valued fish throughout their range from North Carolina to Texas. Recreational anglers catch Spanish mackerel from boats while trolling or drifting and from boats, piers, jetties, and beaches by casting spoons and jigs and live-bait fishing. Fast lure retrieves are key to catching these quick fish. Commercial methods are primarily run-around gill netting, and rarely, by trolling lures similar to those used by recreational anglers.

Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, May 1, 2019.
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, May 1, 2019.

On November 4, 1987, Woody Outlaw caught a world-record 13-pound Spanish mackerel[4]on a blue and white Sea Witch with a strip of fastback menhaden on a 7/0 hook, held by a Shimano bait-casting reel on a Kuna rod with 30-pound test line.[5]

Spanish mackerel are primarily marketed fresh or frozen as fillets as commercially caught fish are too small to sell in the form of steaks. Their raw flesh is white. They may be prepared by broilingfryingbaking or, rarely, by smoking.

Ladyfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Friday, September 13, 2019.
Ladyfish, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Friday, September 13, 2019.

The Spanish mackerel is also a popular sushi fish. By analogy with the Japanese Spanish mackerel, which is a member of the same genus, it is often called sawara on sushi menus.”  Please see more information here.

==================================================

“Spanish Mackerel: Scomberomorous maculatus

Florida Regulations: 

Regulations Gulf State Waters Atlantic State Waters
Minimum Size Limit 12” fork length
Daily Bag Limit 15 per harvester per day

Gear Requirements:

  • Legal Gear: beach or haul seine, cast net, hook and line, spear

State Waters Harvest Seasons

Habitat and Fishing tips:

Spanish mackerel are a pelagic, fast swimming fish that are prevalent throughout Florida’s coastal waters when water temperatures exceed 70 degrees.

To remain in warm water, Spanish mackerel migrate out of the northern parts of the state in the fall of the year and return in April with the warming waters.

Spanish Mackerel, Catch & Release, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, May 1, 2018.
Spanish Mackerel, Catch & Release, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, May 1, 2018.

Mackerel are frequently found in shallow, clear water over grass beds and along sandy beaches where they feed on schools of baitfish. Spanish mackerel are aggressive feeders that will strike a wide variety of natural and artificial baits, so they can be very easy to catch.

Spanish Mackerel, Catch & Release, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Sunday, July 8, 2018.
Spanish Mackerel, Catch & Release, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Sunday, July 8, 2018.

Many anglers identify the location of Spanish mackerel by trolling or watching for birds diving on schools of baitfish, which often indicates that mackerel are forcing the bait to the surface. Angling techniques include trolling or casting with small shiny spoons, dusters or jigs. Light spinning or bait-casting tackle with 10 to 15-pound monofilament line is adequate; however, 30 to 60-pound monofilament leader is required due to the mackerel’s razor-sharp teeth.

State Record:

12 lb, caught near Ft. Pierce

Florida Rule

Gulf Federal Waters Rules

Atlantic Federal Waters Rules

==================================================

King Mackerel: Scomberomorus cavalla

Appearance:

  • Back is bluish-green, fading to silvery sides and belly (no spots)
  • Front of first dorsal fin lacks a dark blotch
  • Lateral line drops sharply below the second dorsal fin
  • Juveniles may have yellowish spots, similar to Spanish mackerel

Similar Species: Cero, S. regalis; Spanish mackerel, S. maculatus (both have gently sloping lateral lines and a dark blotch on front of first dorsal fin); and wahoo, A. solandri (first dorsal fin long and continuous)

Size: Up to 72 inches

Habitat:

Coastal to offshore waters. Often around piers. They may occasionally be found in deep water.

Behavior:

Spawn offshore in mid-summer. Schooling fish that migrate from south Florida waters in winter northward in spring. Feed mainly on fishes.

Additional Information

State Record: 90 lb, caught near Key West

Fishing Tips and Facts: Kings feed on small fish and squid and take both natural and artificial baits. Live baits include pogies, herring, Spanish sardine, ballyhoo, and mullet. Lures should be flashy sub-surface lures or large fish-like plugs. Use 20-pound line and tackle, or heavier for larger kings, with a wire or mono leader.

Recreational Regulations”

FWC source & more information here.

Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, March 9, 2019.
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, March 9, 2019.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams Sunday, June 24, Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Spanish Mackerel, Grass Flats & Oyster Bars, click here for College Of Fishing Hats & Apparel.

We’re located at Castaways Marina, Santiva, Sanibel Island, just before the Blind Pass bridge to Captiva Island.

Fly Fishing, Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service. Saturday, October 21, 2017, [File Photo: 7-7-14]
Fly Fishing, Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service. Saturday,
October 21, 2017, [File Photo: 7-7-14]

After a fierce storm, Turner Beach, the beach adjoining the Pass, is frequently covered with a bounty of shells from Olives to Fighting Whelks to the more common Conchs. The fishing is also renowned with sharks in the summer, tailing redfish on the bayside flats and snook under and off the Blind Pass bridge. Because Turner Beach faces Westward, the sunsets are spectacular and a popular viewing point for residents and visitors alike.

Spanish Mackerel, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, November 20, 2018.
Spanish Mackerel, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, November 20, 2018.

And you can like us on Facebook.

Fair winds and following seas,

Captain Joey Burnsed ~ please click calendar or call 239-472-8658 to book a Sanibel & Captiva Islands, Boca Grande or Fort Myers fishing guide trip or shelling charter.

Spanish Mackerel caught offshore of Captiva on Sanibel & Captiva charters!
Spanish Mackerel caught offshore of Captiva on Sanibel & Captiva charters!

Captiva Fishing, Sandbar Shark, February 27!

Sanibel Fishing Charters, February 27, 2021: Sandbar Shark, Catch & Release!

Red Tide/Algae & Daily Salt Water Quality Update Here.
Blue-Green Algae & Daily Fresh Water Quality Update Here.
Captiva Fishing: Please Click For Rates & To Book A Captiva Fishing Charter Or Call 239-472-8658.
Sandbar Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, February 27, 2021.
Sandbar Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, February 27, 2021.
Sandbar Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, February 7, 2021.
Sandbar Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, February 7, 2021.
Sandbar Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, December 22, 2019.
Sandbar Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, December 22, 2019.
Sandbar Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, February 26, 2019.
Sandbar Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, February 26, 2019.
Sandbar Shark Fishing, Redfish Pass, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Wednesday, December 13, 2017.
Sandbar Shark Fishing, Redfish Pass, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Wednesday, December 13, 2017.

Sanibel Island Fishing Charters, February 27, 2021

Please Click To Rent Homes Direct From Captiva Homeowners; No VRBO Booking Fees.
Vote Water! Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island.

Vote Water For Florida’s Future!

Captiva Fishing Guide Report: February, 27: Sandbar Shark, Catch & Release, Captain Joe’s Charters – a lot of sharks and good fish have moved back into the gulf, bay, and passes; redfish, sheepshead, black drum, snapper, snook, and seatrout are currently present.

Redfish & snook are regulated as catch & release at this time.

Already seeing some positive impact.  Some very nice big redfish and snook around, more big redfish than snook.

The Caloosahatchee freshwater releases are also not an issue right now, but still a huge long-term problem.

Extremely frustrating.  We need wholesale changes in the Florida state government.  It is not a Republican or Democrat issue – it is a Big Sugar control everyone issue.  It is stunning how we continue to let the sugar industry and the agriculture north of Lake Okeechobee to damage the water and all of Florida.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658.

We’re located in Castaways Marina, Santiva, Sanibel Island, just before the Blind Pass bridge to Captiva Island.

Turner Beach, the beach adjoining Blind Pass, is frequently covered with a bounty of shells from Olives to Fighting Whelks to the more common Conchs.

The fishing is also renowned for sharks in the summer, tailing redfish on the bayside flats and snook under and off the Blind Pass bridge. Because Turner Beach faces Westward, the sunsets are spectacular and a popular viewing point for residents and visitors alike.

Captain Joey, Sandbar Shark Fishing, Redfish Pass, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Wednesday, December 13, 2017.
Captain Joey, Sandbar Shark Fishing, Redfish Pass, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Wednesday, December 13, 2017.

“The sandbar shark (Carcharhinus plumbeus) is a species of requiem shark, and part of the family Carcharhinidae, native to the Atlantic Ocean and the Indo-Pacific. It is distinguishable by its very high first dorsal fin and inter-dorsal ridge.[2] It is not to be confused with its similarly named shark cousin, the sand tiger sharkCarcharius taurus.[19]

Tim, Sandbar Shark Fishing, Redfish Pass, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Wednesday, December 13, 2017.
Tim, Sandbar Shark Fishing, Redfish Pass, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Wednesday, December 13, 2017.

The sandbar shark is also called the thick skin shark or brown shark. It is one of the biggest coastal sharks in the world and is closely related to the dusky shark, the bignose shark, and the bull shark. Its dorsal fin is triangular and very high and it has very long pectoral fins. Sandbar sharks usually have heavy-set bodies and rounded snouts that are shorter than the average shark’s snout.

Sandbar Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Wednesday, March 22, 2017.
Sandbar Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Wednesday, March 22, 2017.

Their upper teeth have broadly uneven cusps with sharp edges. Its second dorsal fin and anal fin are close to the same height. Females reach sexual maturity around the age of 13 with an average fork-length (tip of the nose to fork in the tail) of 154.9 cm, while males tend to reach maturity around age 12 with an average fork-length of 151.6 cm.[3] Females can grow to 2–2.5 m (6.6–8.2 ft), males up to 1.8 m (5.9 ft). Its body color can vary from a bluish to a brownish grey to bronze, with a white or pale underside. Sandbar sharks swim alone or gather in sex-segregated schools that vary in size.

Sandbar Shark, South Seas Resort, Redfish Pass, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Wednesday, 1-6-16 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Sandbar Shark, South Seas Resort, Redfish Pass, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Wednesday, 1-6-16 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

The sandbar shark, true to its nickname, is commonly found over muddy or sandy bottoms in shallow coastal waters such as bays, estuaries, harbors, or the mouths of rivers, but it also swims in deeper waters (200 m or more) as well as intertidal zones. Sandbar sharks are found in tropical to temperate waters worldwide; in the western Atlantic, they range from Massachusetts to Brazil.

Sandbar Shark, 1-25-15, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing & Fort Myers Fishing Charters & Guide Service.
Sandbar Shark, 1-25-15, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing & Fort Myers Fishing Charters & Guide Service.

Juveniles are common to abundant in the lower Chesapeake Bay, and nursery grounds are found from Delaware Bay to South Carolina. Other nursery grounds include Boncuk Bay in MarmarisMuğla/Turkey[4] and the Florida Keys.[3]

Natural predators of the sandbar shark include the tiger shark and rarely great white sharks. The sandbar shark itself preys on fish, rays, and crabs.

Sandbar Shark, 1-19-15, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing & Fort Myers Fishing Charters & Guide Service.
Sandbar Shark, 1-19-15, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing & Fort Myers Fishing Charters & Guide Service.

Sandbar sharks are viviparous. The embryos are supported in placental yolk sac inside the mother. Females have been found to exhibit both biennial and triennial reproductive cycles, ovulate in early summer, and give birth to an average of 8 pups, which they carry for 1 year before giving birth.[3] The longevity of the sandbar shark is typically 35–41 years.[5]

Sandbar Shark, 1-18-15, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing & Fort Myers Fishing Charters & Guide Service.
Sandbar Shark, 1-18-15, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing & Fort Myers Fishing Charters & Guide Service.

Sandbar sharks have been disproportionately targeted by the U.S. commercial shark fisheries in recent decades due to their high fin-to-body weight ratio, and U.S. fishing regulation requiring carcasses to be landed along with shark fins. In 2008, the National Marine Fisheries Service banned all commercial landings of sandbar sharks based on a 2006 stock assessment by SEDAR, and sandbar sharks were listed as vulnerable, due to overfishing.

Currently, there are a small number of specially permitted vessels fishing for sandbars sharks for the purpose of scientific research. All vessels in the research fishery are required to carry an independent researcher while targeting sandbars.[3]

Sandbar Shark, 11-26-14, Redfish Pass, North Captiva, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.
Sandbar Shark, 11-26-14, Redfish Pass, North Captiva, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.

In spite of their large size and similar appearance to other dangerous sharks like Bull Sharks, there are very few, if any attacks attributed to sandbar sharks and so they are considered not to be dangerous to people. As a result, they are considered one of the safest sharks to swim with and are popular sharks for aquariums.”  Please see more information here.

Sandbar Shark, 7-20-14, Redfish Pass, North Captiva, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.
Sandbar Shark, 7-20-14, Redfish Pass, North Captiva, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.

Sandbar Shark Summary

  • Snout broadly rounded and short
  • The first dorsal fin is large and triangular, begins over or in front of pectoral fin insertion
  • Back is brown or gray, fading to a white belly
  • Interdorsal ridge present

Similar Species: Dusky shark, C. obscurus (first dorsal starts over pectoral fin free tip); bull shark, C. leucas (no interdorsal ridge)

Size: Up to 8 feet

Coastal and offshore waters, typically found at depths ranging from 60 to 200 feet. May enter estuaries.

Predators and scavengers. Feeding occurs chiefly near the bottom on fish and shellfish.  Migrate long distances and they mature at about 6 feet in length.

Florida State Record: This species is not currently eligible for a state record.

Recreational Regulations”    Please see more information here.

SandbarShark, Captiva Pass, 12-23-14, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.
SandbarShark, Captiva Pass, 12-23-14, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658.  

We’re located in Castaways Marina, Santiva, Sanibel Island, just before the Blind Pass bridge to Captiva Island.

Sandbar Shark, Captain Jimmy Burnsed, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, February 18, 2019.
Sandbar Shark, Captain Jimmy Burnsed, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, February 18, 2019.

After a fierce storm, Turner Beach, the beach adjoining the Pass, is frequently covered with a bounty of shells from Olives to Fighting Whelks to the more common Conchs. The fishing is also renowned for sharks in the summer, tailing redfish on the bayside flats and snook under and off the Blind Pass bridge. Because Turner Beach faces Westward, the sunsets are spectacular and a popular viewing point for residents and visitors alike.

Sandbar Shark, North Captiva, 1-16-14, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing & Fort Myers Fishing Charters & Guide Service.
Sandbar Shark, North Captiva, 1-16-14, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing & Fort Myers Fishing Charters & Guide Service.

Please like us on Facebook!

Fair winds and following seas,

Captain Joey Burnsed ~ please click calendar or call 239-472-8658 to book a Sanibel & Captiva Islands, Boca Grande or Fort Myers fishing guide trip or shelling charter.

Cole & Big Sandbar Shark, Redfish Pass, North Captiva, 2-18-14, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.
Cole & Big Sandbar Shark, Redfish Pass, North Captiva, 2-18-14, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.

Captiva Fishing, Blacknose Shark, February 26!

Sanibel Island Fishing Charters, February 26, 2021: Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release!

Red Tide/Algae & Daily Salt Water Quality Update Here.
Blue-Green Algae & Daily Fresh Water Quality Update Here.
Captiva Fishing: Please Click For Rates & To Book A Captiva Fishing Charter Or Call 239-472-8658.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Friday, February 26, 2021.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Friday, February 26, 2021.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, February 24, 2021.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, February 24, 2021.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, August 3, 2020.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, August 3, 2020.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Friday, June 12, 2020.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Friday, June 12, 2020.
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, March 25, 2020.
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, March 25, 2020.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, February 20, 2020.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, February 20, 2020.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, February 17, 2020.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, February 17, 2020.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, September 30, 2019.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, September 30, 2019.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, September 22, 2019.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, September 22, 2019.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, August 3, 2019.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, August 3, 2019.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Friday, March 29, 2019.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Friday, March 29, 2019.

Sanibel Island Fishing Charters, February 26, 2021.

Please Click To Rent Homes Direct From Captiva Homeowners; No VRBO Booking Fees.
Vote Water! Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island.

Vote Water For Florida’s Future!

Captiva Fishing Guide Report: Friday, February 26: Blacknose Sharks, Catch & Release, Captain Joe’s Charters – the weather is great, no significant red tide presence, and a lot of good fish have moved back into the gulf, bay, and passes; Spanish Mackerel, Sharks, Redfish, Snapper, Snook, and Seatrout are currently present.

Redfish & snook are regulated as catch & release at this time.

Already seeing some positive impact.  Some very nice big redfish and snook around, more big redfish than snook.

The Caloosahatchee freshwater releases are also not an issue right now, but still a huge long-term problem.

Extremely frustrating.  We need wholesale changes in the Florida state government.  It is not a Republican or Democrat issue – it is a Big Sugar control everyone issue.  It is stunning how we continue to let the sugar industry and the agriculture north of Lake Okeechobee to damage the water and all of Florida.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658.

We’re located in Castaways Marina, Santiva, Sanibel Island, just before the Blind Pass bridge to Captiva Island.

Turner Beach, the beach adjoining Blind Pass, is frequently covered with a bounty of shells from Olives to Fighting Whelks to the more common Conchs.

The fishing is also renowned for sharks in the summer, tailing redfish on the bayside flats and snook under and off the Blind Pass bridge. Because Turner Beach faces Westward, the sunsets are spectacular and a popular viewing point for residents and visitors alike.

Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, September 18, 2019.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, September 18, 2019.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, March 26, 2019.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, March 26, 2019.

August 3, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Sanibel Island Fishing Charters: Sharks, Catch & Release.  Please also visit the SanibelFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites. 

A lot fall of snook, both small and large, in the passes right now; for more information just see the recent fishing reports, background on any species, and other recent fishing, water quality reports, and information.

Captiva Island Fishing Charters

September 30: Blacknose Sharks, Catch & Release, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Sanibel Island Fishing Charters: Snook, Catch & Release.  Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.  Better water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.

Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Friday, April 12, 2019.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Friday, April 12, 2019.

“The blacknose shark (Carcharhinus acronotus) is a species of requiem shark, belonging to the family Carcharhinidae, common in the tropical and subtropical waters of the western Atlantic Ocean. This species generally inhabits coastal seagrass, sand, or rubble habitats, with adults preferring deeper water than juveniles.

Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Thursday, May 17, 2018.
Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Thursday, May 17, 2018.

A small shark typically measuring 1.3 m (4.3 ft) long, the blacknose has a typical streamlined “requiem shark” shape with a long, rounded snout, large eyes, and a small first dorsal fin. Its common name comes from a characteristic black blotch on the tip of its snout, though this may be indistinct in older individuals.

Blacknose sharks feed primarily on small bony fishes and cephalopods, and in turn fall prey to larger sharks.

Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, March 5, 2019.

Like other members of their family, they exhibit a viviparous mode of reproduction in which the developing embryos are sustained by a placental connection. The females give birth to three to six young in late spring or early summer, either annually or biennially, after a gestation period of eight to 11 months.

This species is not known to attack humans, though it has been documented performing a threat display towards divers. It is of moderate commercial and recreational importance.

Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, April 15, 2019.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, April 15, 2019.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature has assessed this species as Near Threatened. In 2009, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced the populations of the blacknose shark off the United States are being overfished and proposed new conservation measures.

Drawing of a blacknose shark and one of its upper teeth – the arrows and vertical line refer to diagnostic features of the species.

The Cuban naturalist Felipe Poey published the first description of the blacknose shark in 1860 as Squalus acronotus, in his Memorias sobre la historia natural de la Isla de Cuba. Later authors moved this species to the genus Carcharhinus. The type specimen was a 98-cm (3.2-ft)-long male caught off Cuba.[2]

Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Friday, October 13, 2017, [File Photo: Tuesday, April 11, 2017].
Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Friday, October 13, 2017, [File Photo: Tuesday, April 11, 2017].
Based on morphological data, Jack Garrick suggested in 1982 that the blacknose shark has a sister relationship to a group containing the whitecheek shark (C. dussumieri) and the blackspot shark (C. sealei), while Leonard Compagnoproposed in 1988 that this shark belongs in a group with five other species, including the silky shark (C. falciformis) and the blacktip reef shark (C. melanopterus).

Molecular analyses have been similarly equivocal regarding the blacknose shark’s phylogenetic relationships: Gavin Naylor’s 1992 allozyme analysis found this species to be the most bbasal member of Carcharhinus, while Mine Dosay-Abkulut’s 2008 ribosomal DNA analysis indicated affinity between it and the blacktip shark (C. limbatus) or the smalltail shark (C. porosus).[3][4] The whitenose shark (Nasolamia velox), found along the tropical western coast of the Americas, may be descended from blacknose sharks that experienced the teratogenic effects of incipient cyclopia.[2]

Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Saturday, March 25, 2017.
Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Saturday, March 25, 2017.

The blacknose shark inhabits the continental and insular shelves off the eastern coast of the Americas, as far north as North Carolina and as far south as southern Brazil, including the Bahamas, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean Sea.

They frequent coastal waters over beds of seagrass, sandy flats, and shell or coral rubble.[5]This species is spatially segregated by size and sex. Generally, only young sharks are encountered in shallow water, as the adults prefer depths greater than 9 m (30 ft) and are most common at 18–64 m (59–210 ft).[1][6]

Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, September 3, 2016.
Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, September 3, 2016.

Blacknose sharks in the South Atlantic Bight (off the Atlantic coast of the southern United States) migrate northward in the summer and southward (or possibly offshore) in the winter; a similar migration occurs for sharks in the Gulf of Mexico.[7]

The blacknose shark has a slender, streamlined body with a long, rounded snout and large eyes. There is a well-developed flap of skin in front of each nostril, defining the inflow and outflow openings. Twelve to 13 and 11 to 12 tooth rows occur on either side of the upper and lower jaws, respectively, with one or two teeth at the symphysis (middle). The teeth are triangular and oblique, with serrated edges; the upper teeth are stouter than the lower teeth. The five pairs of gill slits are short, measuring less a third the length of the first dorsal fin base.[6][8]

Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Wednesday, August 31, 2016.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Wednesday, August 31, 2016.

The first dorsal fin is small and somewhat sickle-shaped, with a pointed apex and a short, free, rear tip; its origin lies over the free rear tips of the pectoral fins. The second dorsal fin is relatively large, though still less than half the height of the first. No ridge is seen between the dorsal fins.

The pectoral fins are short and tapered.[8]The body is covered with overlapping dermal denticles that bear five to seven longitudinal ridges (three in very young individuals) leading to three to five marginal teeth.[6]

Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, July 25, 2019.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, July 25, 2019.

The coloration is yellowish to greenish-gray or brown above and white to yellow below. A distinctive dark blotch at the tip of the snout is most obvious in young sharks. The tips of the second dorsal fin, upper caudal fin lobe, and sometimes the lower caudal fin lobe, are dark.

Blacknose sharks are typically 1.3–1.4 m (4.3–4.6 ft) long and 10 kg (22 lb) in weight.[2][8] The maximum length and weight of record is 2.0 m (6.6 ft) and 18.9 kg (42 lb), respectively.[9]

Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, April 14, 2019.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, April 14, 2019.

A small, fast-swimming predator, the blacknose shark feeds primarily on small, bony fishes, including pinfishcroakersporgiesanchoviesspiny boxfish, and porcupinefish, as well as on octopus and other cephalopods.[6]

When competing for bait, their speed allows them to snatch food from larger sharks such as the Caribbean reef shark (C. perezi).[10][11]

Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, April 24, 2019.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, April 24, 2019.

This species may form large schools that are sometimes associated with anchovies and mullet.[6] Blacknose sharks demonstrate a high degree of philopatry: both juveniles and adults have been documented returning to the same local area year after year.[12]

Blacknose sharks are preyed upon by larger sharks,[6] and captives have been observed to perform an apparent threat display towards encroaching divers or newly introduced members of their species. The display consists of the shark hunching its back, lowering its pectoral fins, gaping its jaws, and swimming with an exaggerated side-to-side motion.[2][13]

Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, April 21, 2019.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, April 21, 2019.

Known parasites of this species include the copepods Nesippus orientalisPerissopus dentatusPandarus sinuatusKroyeria sphyrnaeNemesis atlantica, and Eudactylina spinifera,[14] as well as tapeworms in the genera Paraorygmatobothrium and Platybothrium.[15][16]

As in other requiem sharks, the blacknose shark is viviparous: after the developing embryos exhaust their supply of yolk, the empty yolk sac develops into a placental connection through which the mother provides nourishment.

Blacknose Shark, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Tuesday, July 12, 2016.
Blacknose Shark, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Tuesday, July 12, 2016.

Off the United States, males are thought to reproduce every year, while females reproduce every other year.[17] However, off northeastern Brazil, the female reproductive cycle is short enough to occur annually.[1][18]

Vitellogenesis (the formation of yolk within the ovary) occurs in the late summer, and is immediately followed by mating and fertilization in the fall, with the young being born the following spring to summer.[6] The seasonality of these events means the reproductive cycle is offset by six months between populations in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

Man Bites Shark, Blacknose Sharks, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
Man Bites Shark, Blacknose Sharks, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Tuesday, June 28, 2016.

The gestation period has been variously estimated at eight months off northeastern Brazil and 9–11 months off the southeastern United States.[18]

Females typically give birth to litters of one to six pups in shallow nursery areas, such as coastal bays or mangrove swamps;[1][19] one known nursery area is Bulls Bay off South Carolina.[6] There is no relationship between female size and the number of young.[7] The newborns measure 38–50 cm (15–20 in) long.[2]

Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Friday, June 3, 2016.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Friday, June 3, 2016.

Female blacknose sharks grow more slowly, attain a larger ultimate size, and have a longer lifespan than males. In addition, Gulf of Mexico sharks are slower-growing and longer-lived than those from the South Atlantic Bight.[20]

In the South Atlantic Bight, both sexes mature at a fork length (from snout tip to caudal fin fork) of around 90 cm (3.0 ft), corresponding to ages of 4.3 years for males and 4.5 years for females. In the Gulf of Mexico, both sexes mature at a fork length of around 85 cm (2.79 ft), corresponding to ages of 5.4 years for males and 6.6 years for females.[7] The maximum lifespan has been calculated as 19 years in South Atlantic Bight and 16.5 years in the Gulf of Mexico.[1]

Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sunday, May 22, 2016.
Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sunday, May 22, 2016.

The blacknose shark has never been implicated in an attack on humans. However, caution should be exercised if it begins to perform a threat display.[19]

This species is regarded as a game fish and offers a respectable fight on light tackle (a more delicate fishing line).[6] It is also of regional commercial importance, being taken intentionally and as bycatch via gillnets and surface longlines across its range, most significantly off southwestern FloridaVenezuela, and Brazil; the meat is sold dried and salted.

Blacknose Shark, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Thursday, May 19, 2016.
Blacknose Shark, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Thursday, May 19, 2016.

Large numbers of blacknose sharks are also caught incidentally by shrimp trawlers, which may pose a greater threat to its population, as many of the sharks taken are immature.[1][2]

Off the United States, the fishing of the blacknose shark is regulated by the U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service 1993 Fisheries Management Plan (FMP) for Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico sharks.

Blacknose Shark , Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Monday, May 16, 2016.
Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Monday, May 16, 2016.

For the purposes of commercial quotas and bag limits, the blacknose shark is classified within the “small coastal shark” (SCS) complex.[7] From 1999 to 2005, an average of 27,484 blacknose sharks (62 metric tons) were caught each year off the United States.

Recent stock assessments conducted by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have determined the populations of this species have become overfished in both the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico.

Blacknose Shark, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Thursday, April 7, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Blacknose Shark, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Thursday, April 7, 2016, ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

In 2009, the NOAA proposed instituting a separate quota for blacknose sharks of 6,065 sharks per year, and a ban on using gill nets to catch sharks in the Atlantic.[21]

By contrast, blacknose shark stocks off northern Brazil appear to be stable, while no fishery data are available from the Caribbean. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has assessed this species as Near Threatened globally.[1]  Please see the source and more information here.

Blacknose Shark, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sunday, April 3, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Blacknose Shark, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sunday, April 3, 2016, ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams.  Saturday, June 9, Blacknose Sharks, stealing cut bait for Tarpon, click here for College Of Fishing Hats & Apparel.

We’re located in Castaways Marina, Santiva, Sanibel Island, just before the Blind Pass bridge to Captiva Island.

Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, April 11, 2019.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, April 11, 2019.

After a fierce storm, Turner Beach, the beach adjoining the Pass, is frequently covered with a bounty of shells from Olives to Fighting Whelks to the more common Conchs. The fishing is also renowned with sharks in the summer, tailing redfish on the bayside flats and snook under and off the Blind Pass bridge. Because Turner Beach faces Westward, the sunsets are spectacular and a popular viewing point for residents and visitors alike.

Blacknose Reef Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Monday, March 28, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Blacknose Reef Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Monday, March 28, 2016, ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

And you can like us on Facebook.

Fair winds and following seas,

Captain Joey Burnsed ~ please click calendar at the upper right or call 239-472-8658 to book a Sanibel & Captiva Islands, Boca Grande or Fort Myers fishing guide trip or shelling charter.

Captiva Fishing, Atlantic Sharpnose Shark, 4-28-15, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing & Fort Myers Fishing Charters & Guide Service. Captiva Fishing, Atlantic Sharpnose Shark, 4-28-15, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing & Fort Myers Fishing Charters & Guide Service.

Captiva Fishing, Snook, February 25!

Sanibel Fishing Charters, February 25, 2021: Snook, Catch & Release!

Red Tide/Algae & Daily Salt Water Quality Update Here.
Blue-Green Algae & Daily Fresh Water Quality Update Here.
Captiva Fishing: Please Click For Rates & To Book A Captiva Fishing Charter Or Call 239-472-8658.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, February 24, 2021.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, February 24, 2021.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, February 23, 2021.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, February 23, 2021.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, January 1, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, January 1, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, February 2, 2021.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, February 2, 2021.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, January 11, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, January 11, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, December 28, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, December 28, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, December 17, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, December 17, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Friday, November 13, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Friday, November 13, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, November 7, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, November 7, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, November 4, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, November 4, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, November 1, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, November 1, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, October 25, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, October 25, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, October 18, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, October 18, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, October 8, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, October 8, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, October 6, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, October 6, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, October 3, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, October 3, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, August 1, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Saturday, August 1, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, July 9, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, July 9, 2020.
SeaTrout, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, June 28, 2020.
SeaTrout, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Sunday, June 28, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, June 10, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Wednesday, June 10, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, June 8, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, June 8, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island,Saturday, May 2, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island,Saturday, May 2, 2020.
Snook, Captiva Fishing Report: Monday, April 27, 2020.
Snook, Captiva Fishing Report: Monday, April 27, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, January 23, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, January 23, 2020.
Snook Fishing, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, January 7, 2020.
Snook Fishing, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Tuesday, January 7, 2020.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, December 19, 2019.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Thursday, December 19, 2019.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, December 9, 2019.
Snook, Sanibel Island Fishing, Catch & Release, Captiva Island, Monday, December 9, 2019.